February 15- Make An Impact Day!

Resources:

February 15th THURSDAY Make an Impact

Be an inspiration to those in your community by finding a need and making a difference in the lives of others! Plan a service event or a Lead2Feed project with your chapter.

FCCLA Chapters have been doing service projects that include support for their local Food Shelves.
FCCLA Chapters will be participating in the State Conference Service Project parade of posters to celebrate the work chapters have been doing in their communities. Be part of the celebration of service on Thursday General Session with the Service Parade.  Submit chapter delegate’s names on state conference registration per service project to carry an art foam board poster into the First General Session.

MN FCCLA has been chosen for Youth Service America’s Campaign (a competitive grant) for 2018 Lead Agency for GYSDAY. We will be celebrating service projects that FCCLA chapters have done and conducting a activity at State FCCLA Conference in partnership with We Day. That will be a Walk4Water.

WE Day– MN FCCLA is working to become an educational partner with We Day. State Officers have discussed a way to be involved in the Global campaign called Walk4Water. We are going to embed the We Walk4Water campaign into activities we will do during the State Conference. Chapter members will “carry water” to simulate how people in many countries access water. More details on the logistics of how your chapter members will be able to participate will be coming soon.

Why focus on clean water? Minnesota is a land of 10,000 lakes, so we often take water for granted.  But we now that globally, access to safe and clean sanitation facilities for both genders increases school attendance among teenage girls.

Education surrounding healthy sanitation and hygiene practices helps with behavior change in school children, whereby students are practicing good water use and sanitation behaviors. This also increases the knowledge of these practices among their parents and other community members.

 

Access to clean water improves the health of community members, creates healthier practices surrounding sanitation and hygiene, resulting in the reduction of waterborne diseases and provides a consistent source of water for drinking and food preparation. In fact, clean water is one of the most crucial and efficient ways to lift a community out of poverty.

Water is heavy. The World Health Organization recommends 20-50 liters of water per person per day for drinking, cooking and washing. That amounts to hauling between 44 and 110 pounds of water daily for use by each household member.

And in many places, water sources are far from homes. In Asia and Africa, women walk an average of 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per day collecting water. Carrying such loads over long distances can result in strained backs, shoulders and necks, and other injuries if women have to walk over uneven and steep terrain or on busy roads.

Clean water access allows girls to go to school instead of bearing the responsibility of transporting their family’s water. Clean water reduces water-borne illness and leads to better agriculture and access to food.

80% of illnesses in the developing world are linked to poor water and sanitation. Unsafe water, and poor sanitation and hygiene kill an estimated 1.7 million people annually.

600,000 children a year die from illnesses like diarrhea that are directly attributed to unclean water.

A study of water poverty in sub-Saharan African found that women and girls spend at least 16 million hours a day collected drinking water, while men spend 6 million hours.

 

Speak Your Mind

*