February 15- Make An Impact Day!

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February 15th THURSDAY Make an Impact

Be an inspiration to those in your community by finding a need and making a difference in the lives of others! Plan a service event or a Lead2Feed project with your chapter.

FCCLA Chapters have been doing service projects that include support for their local Food Shelves.
FCCLA Chapters will be participating in the State Conference Service Project parade of posters to celebrate the work chapters have been doing in their communities. Be part of the celebration of service on Thursday General Session with the Service Parade.  Submit chapter delegate’s names on state conference registration per service project to carry an art foam board poster into the First General Session.

MN FCCLA has been chosen for Youth Service America’s Campaign (a competitive grant) for 2018 Lead Agency for GYSDAY. We will be celebrating service projects that FCCLA chapters have done and conducting a activity at State FCCLA Conference in partnership with We Day. That will be a Walk4Water.

WE Day– MN FCCLA is working to become an educational partner with We Day. State Officers have discussed a way to be involved in the Global campaign called Walk4Water. We are going to embed the We Walk4Water campaign into activities we will do during the State Conference. Chapter members will “carry water” to simulate how people in many countries access water. More details on the logistics of how your chapter members will be able to participate will be coming soon.

Why focus on clean water? Minnesota is a land of 10,000 lakes, so we often take water for granted.  But we now that globally, access to safe and clean sanitation facilities for both genders increases school attendance among teenage girls.

Education surrounding healthy sanitation and hygiene practices helps with behavior change in school children, whereby students are practicing good water use and sanitation behaviors. This also increases the knowledge of these practices among their parents and other community members.

 

Access to clean water improves the health of community members, creates healthier practices surrounding sanitation and hygiene, resulting in the reduction of waterborne diseases and provides a consistent source of water for drinking and food preparation. In fact, clean water is one of the most crucial and efficient ways to lift a community out of poverty.

Water is heavy. The World Health Organization recommends 20-50 liters of water per person per day for drinking, cooking and washing. That amounts to hauling between 44 and 110 pounds of water daily for use by each household member.

And in many places, water sources are far from homes. In Asia and Africa, women walk an average of 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per day collecting water. Carrying such loads over long distances can result in strained backs, shoulders and necks, and other injuries if women have to walk over uneven and steep terrain or on busy roads.

Clean water access allows girls to go to school instead of bearing the responsibility of transporting their family’s water. Clean water reduces water-borne illness and leads to better agriculture and access to food.

80% of illnesses in the developing world are linked to poor water and sanitation. Unsafe water, and poor sanitation and hygiene kill an estimated 1.7 million people annually.

600,000 children a year die from illnesses like diarrhea that are directly attributed to unclean water.

A study of water poverty in sub-Saharan African found that women and girls spend at least 16 million hours a day collected drinking water, while men spend 6 million hours.

 

FCCLA Week- Say Thanks to your supportive persons!

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February 14th WEDNESDAY Say Thanks

Valentines Day is a great opportunity to take time to show your appreciation for those who have been an inspiration and support during your FCCLA journey. Send notes of appreciation to thank them!

 

 

 

 

 

Who in the FCCLA family of teachers, students or officers has influenced you positively?

The many faces of FCCLA have a positive peer influence on you to develop great character skills that will serve you in your future.

 

 

 

 

Leaders can motivate, inspire and give you support. Say thanks to those who come to mind!

Set your goals for Atlanta for National FCCLA in late June.

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We’re headed to Atlanta for National FCCLA Conference in June.

Students all across Minnesota are preparing their STAR Events, officer candidate applications and saving money to head to Atlanta in late June for National FCCLA Conference. Minnesota delegation will be staying at the Omni Hotel June 28—July 2. Memories are made from travelling to a National Conference!

What will the National Conference experience be like?

  • Starfish and STAR Events!
  • Civil Rights history and STAR Competitions.
  • Sghtseeing in Atlanta and MN State Meetings!
  • Omni Hotel next to CNN headquarters and Organizational Business meetings!
  • Trains, planes, taxis and buses.

There will be tons of opportunities to meet other members and advisers from throughout the country! You will have experiences in Leadership workshops and exhibits which will give ideas for your chapter projects. Seeing the sights of Atlanta which include: Civil Rights museum and some of America’s history, the Georgia Aquarium, one of the best in the world, lots of southern regional foods to try.

 

 

So start planning and raising your funds! Make it your goal to attend. FCCLA Fundraising Toolkit

MN FCCLA is a 2018 Lead State Agency for Global Youth Service Day!

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We know the impact of youth service is huge!

For over 18 years, MN FCCLA has lead service-learning efforts for Global Youth Service Day in April. This is a competitive grant from Youth Service America to become a Lead State Agency.

We encourage chapters to start planning service efforts to benefit their communities, schools and the world. Starting with Martin Luther King Day in January and ending with GYSDAY April 19-21 during the State Conference we will be recognizing the efforts of Chapters and members to develop and carry out service learning efforts.

Minnesota FCCLA is currently challenging chapters to make an impact in their local communities!

This year during the Minnesota FCCLA State Conference, students from chapters that have completed a Service Project STAR Event will receive on stage recognition. All students are asked to bring in a display board of pictures, data, and research of the project that they’ve worked very hard on this year. This is an excellent way to show the other chapters what you’ve done this year. It’s also a good opportunity to get ideas from other chapters to see what STAR Event projects you might want to part-take in the upcoming years. Show off your service projects to the whole Minnesota State Leadership Conference this year with our service parade.

 

Respectfully,

Massen Kunerth

Minnesota FCCLA

State VP of Service

GET READY FOR STAR EVENTS!

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STAR Events are just around the corner!

Check out the dates for Midwinter STAR Events to show what you have learned or done with your chapter. There are over 50 STAR Event opportunities in Minnesota for jr high, senior high and occupational categories.

January 16 Central East Area at St Tim’s church in Blaine.

January 17 SouthWest Area at Tyler at the Danebod Folk School.

January 24 SouthEast Area at Pine Island High School.

January 24 Northern Area at Lancaster HS.

January 31 Central West Area at Wheaton HS.

STAR Events are an opportunity to develop your 21st Century Process Skills such as Creativity, Leadership, Critical Thinking, Management, Goal Setting, Problem Solving, Decision Making and Cooperative learning.

We look forward to the presentations that MN FCCLA members will be doing as an individual or as a team. STAR events are described on the Competitive Events page. MN FCCLA Advisers have been given the password.

Spice Up Your Year and Choose a Chapter Theme!

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Engage your chapter in coming up with a chapter theme for your year- something that happens at each meeting, or something that you celebrate each month……

As most of you know, every year the Executive Council comes up with a new year-long theme for Minnesota FCCLA. This year, we are encouraging chapters to think of their own individual year-long themes or individual themes for each meeting. You may be wondering where to start or what you can do for a theme. The great part about this is that your chapter can choose almost anything they want for a theme or themes for meetings as long as they are FCCLA appropriate.

There are so many different options for theme ideas, and the fun part is working together as a chapter to make it creative and fun.

 

You could base it off of music genres, movies, TV shows, sports, holidays, and much more. As I stated before, this can be one theme for the whole year or a new theme for each meeting. The important part is to incorporate this theme or themes into your chapter’s meetings through decorations, activities, and whatever else your chapter can come up with.

Chapter themes are a great way to spruce up your meetings and attract more new members. Don’t be afraid to take plenty of awesome selfies that show your themes and post them to social media with #MNFCCLA! We love to see your great photos! We hope you have fun creating your themes and have a great rest of your school year!

By Johannah Nielsen, MN FCCLA Vice President of Marketing

Stand Out from the Crowd With Your High Emotional Intelligence!

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How teens can increase their ability to be emotionally intelligent?

Being emotionally intelligent is the ability to identify, understand, and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. More and more, businesses are relying on references and personality assessments to measure a potential employee’s emotional intelligence, instead of just focusing on what school they attended, their grades, or their interview skills. Someone with a high emotional intelligence stands out from the crowd. They have the ability to work well with others, accept and adapt to change, build strong relationships, make good decisions, deal with difficult situations, control impulses, solve problems, and communicate clearly.

Studies show that teens with high emotional intelligence  are more productive in the workplace, have better career advancement, are more effective leaders, and have better work relationships. FCCLA leadership roles and the National FCCLA Student Body program can help you develop your skills.

As with all personality traits, some people have naturally good emotional intelligence, while others need to work on them. The good news is that everyone can get better! Emotional intelligence is something that develops as we mature. The best way to develop emotional intelligence is to practice the five skills of emotional intelligence:

Self-Awareness, the ability to identify your own emotions and recognize their impact and being able to notice and accurately label everyday feelings; Emotional Management, the ability to control our reaction to our feelings and/or use our feelings to guide decisions and knowing when, where and how to most effectively express our feelings; Empathy, the ability to recognize others’ emotions and accurately interpret their verbal and nonverbal cues and helps the individual know appropriate things to say and ways to behave around someone who is feeling strong emotions; Choosing Your Mood, recognizing that moods are something we can control, deciding which mood is right for specific situations, and getting ourselves into an appropriate mood; and Conflict Management, the ability to inspire, influence, and develop others while successfully avoiding or managing conflict and it involves handling social interaction appropriately.

Written by Abigail Allen, MN FCCLA State Secretary

Prepare for Future Careers That May Not Even Exist

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We are in the twenty-first century and think we have discovered everything, but we may not have. There may be jobs out there that may not even exist yet.

FCCLA can help you prepare for those careers.

 

In your career you will need to know how to talk to people, how to present your ideas, and how to work with people. FCCLA can teach you all of those things and here is how.

Talking to people is feared more than death, but as FCCLAers we have the amazing opportunity to talk in front of people through STAR Events, running for an officer position, or even through going to a conference and meeting new people.

 

 

 

Presenting your ideas is hard, but STAR Events help us practice different ways of this exact thing. We learn how to use powerpoints, display boards, and portfolios. Any business or employer goes crazy over someone who knows how to present an idea without fear.

Working with people who you do not particularly know is next to impossible, however; FCCLA can help with that. FCCLA officers have multiple ways of getting you to work with others you do not know.

 

 

 

 

 

You can get any credentials through college, but these skills are hard to learn alone, FCCLA is here to help you prepare for those future careers. Some 21st Century Skills are; Creativity, Leadership, Critical Thinking, Management, Goal Setting, Problem Solving, Decision Making and Cooperative Learning.

Bethany Janssen, Vice President of Partnerships

 

Make a difference with the FACTS National Program!

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Did you know?

16-year-olds have higher crash rates than drivers of any other age.

56% of teens said they talk on the phone while driving.

Motor-vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death in the United States.

Compared with urban residents, rural residents are at an increased risk for death from crashes and are less likely to wear seat belts.

 

FACTS is a national FCCLA peer education program through which students strive to save lives through personal, vehicle, and road safety. Teens work to educate adults and youth about traffic safety and support enforcement of local rules and regulations regarding community traffic safety. Youth leaders can help families promote basic safety attitudes that can last a lifetime. FACTS gives teens the knowledge and incentives they need to build an understanding of what it means to drive safely, both today and in the future. Through this program, young people plan and carry out projects that help them and their peers make informed, responsible decisions about traffic safety.

FACTS projects relate to three topic areas: people, vehicles, and roads – to understand and promote your role as a driver or passenger on the road as well as the hazards you may encounter and how to avoid or react to them with vehicle safety. FCCLA also offers national recognition to chapters that complete FCCLA FACTS projects; this honor includes cash awards and special recognition at the National Leadership Conference, online, and in Teen Times magazine.

Through working closely with FACTS, or Families, Acting, for Community, Traffic, Safety I have developed both basic and in-depth knowledge about not only traffic safety but life lessons on teamwork, critical thinking, interpersonal communication, and career preparation.

Best of luck on your FACTS Projects everyone!!

Respectfully,

Massen Kunerth

Minnesota FCCLA VP of Service

Why seek education beyond high school?

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Why seek education beyond high school? It could earn you 19% to 65% more income for the future than a high school diploma would.

Postsecondary education—broadly defined as a credential beyond a high school diploma—continues to be one of the major gateways to family-sustaining jobs.  Workers with higher levels of education and skills tend to have greater earnings than workers with lower levels.

In 2013, associate’s degree holders earned about 19 percent more than high school graduates with no college and 65 percent more than workers with less than a high school diploma.

FCCLA is based on Career and technical education that has STAR Events, and projects based on career pathways in family and consumer sciences education.

Career pathways are linked education and training services that enable students to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment in a given industry or occupational sector especially in high wage or high need jobs.
Each step on a career pathway is designed to prepare students to progress to the next level of education and employment.
The career pathways framework weaves together adult education, training, and postsecondary programs and connects those services to employers’ workforce needs.

Career pathways that many STAR Events link to are Early Childhood Education, Teaching and training, Culinary Arts and Hospitality industry jobs, Interior Design or Human Services.

Career pathways include multiple entry and exit points, learner-centered instruction and delivery, assessment of skills and needs, support services, and quality work experiences.